Thursday, 1 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 The African Tax Administration Forum (ATAF) has called on African Countries to invest in technology as one way of curbing illicit Capital flows from the continent.

 
“Electronic systems play a huge role in curbing corruption and by extension illicit flows,” ATAF Executive Secretary Logan Wort told Journalists during a recent media briefing in Pretoria, South Africa.
 
However, Wort cautioned that the systems cannot entirely stop illicit flows arguing that when people intend to break the law they can do it.
 
“Illicit is by very nature illicit and it will always be there,” said.
 
Illicit financial flows refer to a form of illegal capital flight and occur when money is illegally earned, transferred, or spent. This money is intended to disappear from any record in the country of origin, and earnings on the stock of illicit financial flows outside of a country generally do not return to the country of origin.
 
Thursday, 1 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 The security of Africa’s development is under threat. We cannot afford to exclude young people from economic opportunities. In the short term, however, we need to introduce job-creation programmes. In Nigeria, we have engaged in programmes to create short-term job opportunities, including a community services programme for unskilled youth, and a graduate internship scheme, which will support 50,000 university graduates to acquire work experience in private-sector entities. We also created a special fund to provide grants of up to $70,000 to young entrepreneurs.

Thursday, 1 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 The security of Africa’s development is under threat. We cannot afford to exclude young people from economic opportunities. In the short term, however, we need to introduce job-creation programmes. In Nigeria, we have engaged in programmes to create short-term job opportunities, including a community services programme for unskilled youth, and a graduate internship scheme, which will support 50,000 university graduates to acquire work experience in private-sector entities. We also created a special fund to provide grants of up to $70,000 to young entrepreneurs.

Thursday, 1 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 Startups hoping to participate in this year’s DEMO Africa, which showcases innovations from across the continent, have three weeks left to apply. Technology entrepreneurs from Africa are asked to apply through venture community VC4Africa, a platform for showcasing African ventures and a trusted DEMO Africa partner, before July 30. HumanIPO reported last week it had partnered with Nairobi-based DEMO Africa in a bid to increase publicity and awareness of the tech scene on the continent. Harry Hare, executive producer at DEMO Africa, said: “The bar is set even higher this year as we take the companies that have the highest potential and expose them to a growing number of investors, media and technology buyers.”

Thursday, 1 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 Traxler warns that commercial suppliers will not deliver education to the bottom billion. "There will still be parts of the curriculum or parts of the population left uncovered", he says. It might in theory be government's responsibility to plug those gaps, but the more realistic place to look for solutions is "at the spot where market and education might just overlap".

Traxler foresees that formal school systems funded by government will have diminishing power to raise educational standards.
However, there is an alternative: "working with social entrepreneurs, those individuals embedded within their own communities, prepared to blend making a profit and delivering a social service, perhaps analogous to community teachers in rural schools in Kenya or bare-foot doctors in China".
In most of Africa, this is going to be what I call a 'Just in Time' model of learning. This means: work-related information at the point of need, assuming you didn't get the basics at school. The vector for delivering it is often going to be ICT, but it could be a training session of any kind.
 
Thursday, 1 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 Africa’s technology landscape is vast and growing. It is ripe for expansion and is increasingly becoming an attractive environment for companies (local and international) to set up shop and invest. The people on this list have taken advantage of this growth and have established themselves as pioneers in the industry. Some of them are investors, others are entrepreneurs and bloggers, but a common thread is that they are all African and are behind some of the most inspiring and innovative companies in tech.